Posts Tagged With: honeymoon island state park

Second Honeymoon

(This is a continuation of our last article, Honeymoon.)

 

Same day, same place, same sense of wonder at the diversity of birds!

I used too many words in the first part of this post so let’s just look at some pictures.

 

Just off the beach we found a freshwater pond containing a few Common Gallinules and four Black-crowned Night Herons.

Black-crowned Night Heron

Black-crowned Night Heron

 

The Herring Gull is one of the largest gulls we see in our area and typically only in the winter.

Herring Gull

Herring Gull

 

American Oystercatchers breed along our Gulf Coast although they are not numerous. They have large flat bills which they use to pry open mollusks. Equal opportunity feeders, they won’t pass up much of anything that looks like food.

American Oystercatcher

American Oystercatcher

 

An immature Bald Eagle cruised just off the beach searching for a seafood breakfast. They will readily take birds and mammals but seem to prefer fish. They are also notorious thieves, harassing other birds and stealing their food.

Bald Eagle (Immature)

Bald Eagle (Immature)

 

This Osprey has his Speckled Trout meal secured and is heading for a perch away from the Eagle’s prying eyes.

Osprey

Osprey

 

We were surprised on the mudflats adjacent to the beach by an uncommon winter White-crowned Sparrow. He posed for a few candid shots and disappeared into the mangroves.

White-crowned Sparrow

White-crowned Sparrow

 

While we were admiring the above sparrow, a Clapper Rail emerged from the dense reeds searching for crabs and shrimp. These birds are very secretive and are normally heard but not often seen. This is only the second one I’ve observed.

Clapper Rail

Clapper Rail

 

The path from the parking area to the beach yielded a Monarch Butterfly, a Sedge Wren and a House Wren.

Monarch  (Danaus plexippus)

Monarch (Danaus plexippus)

Sedge Wren

Sedge Wren

 

House Wren

House Wren

 

We took a short hike along Osprey Trail, one of the few remaining virgin slash pine stands in south Florida. Guess what we found?

Osprey

Osprey

 

Also along Osprey Trail we encountered a living fossil, the Gopher Tortoise munching his morning salad.

Gopher Tortoise

Gopher Tortoise

 

Returning to the trailhead along a different route we remained under the watchful eyes of an American Kestrel.

American Kestrel

American Kestrel

 

 

It was a terrific day. We saw a lot of birds and wildlife and best of all I was able to recall many fond memories. The honeymoon continues …

 

We hope you enjoy your search for a natural place and come back for a visit!

 

 

Additional Information

Honeymoon Island State Park

Great Florida Birding and Wildlife Trail

 

Categories: Birds, Florida, Photography | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | 24 Comments

Honeymoon

Salt water sloshed over the transom as our small boat motored from the relative calm of the shallow flats into the deeper waters of the channel which would take us through Hurricane Pass to the Gulf of Mexico and “big fish”. The little 15-foot craft was laden with four teenagers, fishing tackle, ice chest and groceries. As we approached the pass, the waters of the Gulf were all capped in white foam and appeared to form a watery wall warning against entry. Good sense prevailed. We came about and were content pulling in speckled trout and Spanish mackerel from the shallower but more peaceful waters of the bay. As Gini waited patiently for me to place another bait on her hook, she let the line and empty hook drag lazily through the turquoise water. “I got a fish!”, she exclaimed. A plump trout joined his friends in the ice chest. That was 50 years ago.

Catching fish with no bait. That’s the sort of person she is. A few weeks ago, as she was waiting for me to return from a hike, a wren flew in the open car window, perched on my pack in the back seat, chirped at her and flitted away. Strangers, birds, fish – and me – cannot resist her magical charm.

Old maps called it Sand Island. The local settlers referred to the place as Hog Island. In the 1940’s a northern developer built a dozen thatched huts on the sand and together with Life magazine ran a contest for newlyweds. The lucky winners got to spend two weeks on “Honeymoon Isle”. World War II interrupted blissful lives and the huts fell into disrepair. The name stuck, however. We spent many happy days on the beaches, sandbars and waters around Honeymoon Island when we were young. A bucket of cold chicken, watermelon, catching fish, playing in the clear waters under impossibly blue skies … how wonderful Life can be!

The state of Florida began acquiring the land on Honeymoon Island in the 1950’s and eventually placed it into the state park system. A causeway built in 1964 facilitated public access. Condominiums, concessions and crowds soon followed. Today almost one million visitors annually visit this park which has been consistently ranked in the top five beaches in the entire country. Now when Gini and I visit, our selective vision still sees only sand and water.

I recently traveled to Honeymoon Island with two talented birders and we spent a chilly but productive morning combing the beach, marsh and upland trails. With relative low temperatures and a “brisk” wind coming in from the Gulf of Mexico we didn’t have too many sunbathers to step around. We found over 60 species including five species of Plover, a group of 60 Red Knot, an unusually good look at a Clapper Rail and an uncommon White-crowned Sparrow.

It was a great day of birding.

Yes, of course there are pictures!

 

Even if you don’t get a good look at the Spotted Sandpiper, its characteristic tail bobbing as it feeds is a pretty good indication of its identification. In breeding season, the undersides will be covered in large dark spots.

Spotted Sandpiper

Spotted Sandpiper

 

A Black-bellied Plover comes in for a landing on the shoreline. It lacks its namesake black belly during the winter.

Black-bellied Plover

Black-bellied Plover

 

Our smallest sandpiper, the Least Sandpiper, enjoys a bath in the cold water.

Least Sandpiper

Least Sandpiper

Least Sandpiper

Least Sandpiper

 

One of the small “peep” sandpipers, the Western Sandpiper is distinguished from the Semipalmated and Least Sandpipers by dark colored legs and a slightly longer bill which normally droops a bit at the end.

Western Sandpiper

Western Sandpiper

 

Semipalmated Plovers are named for a partial webbing between the middle and outer toes but you need to be pretty close to see that feature.

Semipalmated Plover

Semipalmated Plover

 

Just a bit larger than the above Semipalmated Plover, relatively large black bills help identify the Wilson’s Plover even at a distance.

Wilson's Plover

Wilson’s Plover

Wilson's Plover

Wilson’s Plover

 

Piping Plovers have a short “chunky” looking bill compared to other plovers. This species is threatened and endangered worldwide. The bird in the fourth image below sports a yellow leg band (ring) which was likely attached near the Great Lakes. I couldn’t get a look at the band number.

Piping Plover

Piping Plover

Piping Plover

Piping Plover

Piping Plover

Piping Plover

Piping Plover

Piping Plover

 

Even smaller than the Piping Plover is the Snowy Plover. Its bill is a bit slimmer and these guys seem to always be running, screeching to a halt to probe the sand and then running off down the beach again. Unfortunately, this species is also threatened.

Snowy Plover

Snowy Plover

 

Flipping over a rock can sometimes yield a meal for the Ruddy Turnstone and that’s how they got their name. They are also quick to turn over shells and, in this case, a whole pile of seaweed. Once this bird moved all the grass a horde of other birds swooped in to scoop up the goodies.

Ruddy Turnstone

Ruddy Turnstone

Ruddy Turnstone

Ruddy Turnstone

 

Ruddy Turnstone

Ruddy Turnstone

Ruddy Turnstone

Ruddy Turnstone

 

Dunlins nest in the Arctic tundra and spend winter along our coasts. They have a longish bill which is usually curved downward. They can look fairly plain in their non-breeding plumage.

Dunlin

Dunlin

Dunlin

Dunlin

 

Similar in size to the Dunlin, Sanderlings also nest in the Arctic. It’s very pale in non-breeding plumage and its bill is not as long as a Dunlin’s and is usually straight. These are the birds we see at the beach in winter right at the edge of the water being chased by the waves.

Sanderling

Sanderling

Sanderling

Sanderling

 

Another tundra breeder, the Red Knot is normally pretty gray looking by the time they arrive in our area for the winter. Occasionally, they will begin to attain their beautiful reddish plumage in late spring before returning to the Arctic to nest.

Red Knot

Red Knot

Red Knot

Red Knot

 

Red Knot, Short-billed Dowitcher

Red Knot, Short-billed Dowitcher

 

Okay, I not only got carried away with a bunch of words but tried to stuff a lot of photographs in here as well. So, this adventure is —– TO BE CONTINUED.

 

Additional Information

Honeymoon Island State Park

Great Florida Birding and Wildlife Trail

 

See more birds at:   Paying Ready Attention   (Check out Wild Bird Wednesday.)

 

 

 

Categories: Birds, Florida, Photography | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 28 Comments

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