Posts Tagged With: eastern phoebe

Birding Bridgewater Before Breakfast

“I’ll be back in time for a late breakfast.”

She is still laughing.

Part of the 7,000+ acre Tenoroc Public Use Area, the “Bridgewater Tract” is literally five minutes from the house. Unfortunately, one must first check in at the headquarters building which is about 15 minutes up the road. A small inconvenience. We visit Tenoroc often due to its proximity and diverse mix of bird species. With over 1,000 acres of lakes, open grassy areas, mixed pine and hardwood forests and wetlands, the potential for a really good birding day is always high.

The Bridgewater Tract is adjacent to Lake Parker, a 2100 acre body of water within the city limits of Lakeland, Florida. Like the rest of the Tenoroc lands, Bridgewater consists of reclaimed phosphate mining areas. The former mining pits have been stocked with fish and the surrounding habitat has been managed to somewhat resemble what it looked like over 50 years ago. The results are apparently agreeable with the birds.

All the lakes within the Tenoroc system are fairly deep, following years of phosphate extraction. Relatively deep water begins almost immediately along the shoreline. With very little shallow water available, wading birds and “puddle” ducks are scarce. Abundant trees and dense undergrowth, especially near the water, is very attractive to a large number of other birds. A few trails wind through open grass and wetland areas as well as through woodlands.

Of course, I knew very well breakfast would be nothing but a memory by the time I finished exploring. Gini had managed to stop laughing by the time I returned and had lunch almost ready. Best. Wife. Ever.

My morning observations broke no records but it sure was enjoyable!

 

A small group of Common Grackles were excited about a hawk in their territory. Our geographic variant of this species shows a bit more purple iridescence than birds in other parts of the country.

Tenoroc FMA Bridgewater Tract

 

Joining the grackles in screaming about the hawk, a couple of Red-winged Blackbirds flew into the tree tops.

Tenoroc FMA Bridgewater Tract

 

North America’s smallest woodpecker is the Downy Woodpecker. With a splash of bright red on his head, this male inspected every inch of several branches, scooping up insects almost without any hesitation.

Tenoroc FMA Bridgewater Tract

 

Pine Warblers have an incredible range of plumage, from almost all gray to bright yellow. Even this somewhat drab bird has a beauty which cannot be denied.

Tenoroc FMA Bridgewater Tract

 

Birders’ affliction. We are either gazing upward or have binoculars glued to our faces trying to discern what exactly is in the center of a bush. As a result of this affliction, we stumble over logs and roots, step into puddles, frighten poor snakes trying to get out of our way and are sometimes surprised to find someone gazing back at us. The raccoon was quick to depart.

Tenoroc FMA Bridgewater Tract

 

Migration is in full swing and one species whose numbers really burgeon during this time is the Blue-gray Gnatcatcher. This one held still longer than most.

Tenoroc FMA Bridgewater Tract

 

A cautious female Common Yellowthroat is not as bright as the male but her subdued plumage exudes a beauty all its own.

Tenoroc FMA Bridgewater Tract

 

“Butcher Bird”. I grew up using this name for the Loggerhead Shrike. Apparently, it is a widely used nickname for the small gray hunter. Carcasses of insects and lizards impaled on a thorn, twig or barbed-wire fence are tell-tale signs of a shrike in the area.

Tenoroc FMA Bridgewater Tract

 

Although it is almost officially winter, here in subtropical Florida we are still blessed with the presence of dragons. One of the small and colorful Odonata, a Blue Dasher (Pachydiplax longipennis), allowed a quick photo op before “dashing” to chase a mosquito. I knew I liked dragonflies for a reason!

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One of our winter visitors, an Eastern Phoebe, gave me a quizzical glance as I neared her perch, trying to decide if I meant her any harm. I changed direction and she kept up her search for breakfast.

Tenoroc FMA Bridgewater Tract

 

As a Bald Eagle soared overhead, I realized how high the sun was above the horizon. Leaving the eagle to search for a breakfast fish, I headed home.

Tenoroc FMA Bridgewater Tract

 

Hiking around the lakes and among the trees, observing nature as it awakened to a new day was worth missing breakfast. Returning home to the welcoming embrace of the woman I love reminded me how truly blessed I am. Find a place near you to observe birds and wild things – just remember to appreciate what is really important in your life.

 

Enjoy your search for a natural place and come back for a visit!

 

Additional Information

Tenoroc Public Use Area

Categories: Birds, Florida, Photography, Travel, Wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 9 Comments

Not So Far Afield

You would think that I’d learn. “Tomorrow will start clear and dry and a few clouds may roll in during the afternoon.” Weather reporters. Sigh.

Fifty yards down the path, my face felt a few drops of what my Dad would have called “heavy dew”. Rain. Keep going? Turn back? I tucked the camera body under my shirt tail and put the lens covers over the binoculars. A Gray Catbird “mewed” sarcastically from a tangle of willows. Two Blue-gray Gnatcatchers crisscrossed the trail in front of me, daring me to whip out the camera and try to catch them between raindrops. Nature can be so cruel.

Around a bend, there was an opening through which I could see a lovely lake, wetlands extending for some distance and several large dead trees. Among the branches of the tallest snag was an Osprey nest and atop the highest limb perched an Osprey, surveying his wet kingdom. I was so enthralled with the view I had not noticed the rain had stopped.

This trail was new to me and I explored about a mile and a half before heading back to the car. Lakes on one side, old-growth hardwood forest on the other. “Birdy.”

We have written about this location before and doubtless will again. Tenoroc Public Use Area. I’m not sure when it changed, but it used to be known as Tenoroc Fish Management Area. Tenoroc is managed by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP). Over 7,000 acres of fishing lakes, hiking/equestrian trails, a shooting range and special recreation areas for children and people with physical limitations. It is a “gateway” site for The Great Florida Birding and Wildlife Trail.

Did I mention it’s only ten minutes from the house?

By the time I returned to the car, I was almost dry and Gini was several chapters farther along in her book. Granola bars and fresh slices of orange fortified us for more exploring.

There was no more rain and the clouds eventually parted to reveal a deep blue sky and plenty of sunshine. We discovered amazing sights, sounds and supreme satisfaction!

(NOTE: These images are from two different visits, the second and third weeks of October 2019.)

 

An Osprey above an old nest. In Florida, nesting season for the Osprey begins in December and old nests are renovated and reused over and over. (Sadly, this particular nest was destroyed by a violent windstorm after our first visit.) This image provides an idea of habitat typical for the area. If you are able to enlarge the photo, you may spot a Belted Kingfisher near the bottom of the frame just left of center.

Tenoroc FMA

 

A House Wren dared me to take his picture in the rain. These “little brown jobs” only visit us during migration.

Tenoroc FMA

 

Another fall/winter visitor is the Eastern Phoebe. We heard them calling everywhere we stopped. This one kept her eye on a grasshopper which she eventually grabbed and flew out of sight to enjoy.

Tenoroc FMA

 

Little Blue Herons in good light show a subtle diversity of color in their plumage. Yes, this fellow loudly let me know I was disturbing his breakfast hunt.

Tenoroc FMA

 

Fall migration is in full swing and there were plenty of colorful feathered things scampering high in the treetops. I managed to get a shot directly above me of a busy Magnolia Warbler. One would think bright yellow would really stand out in the middle of a tree. One would be mistaken.

Tenoroc FMA

 

Black and orange, on the other hand, are hard to miss. A male American Redstart stopped and stared for 1/500th of a second. Click. Thank you, sir!

Tenoroc FMA

 

There’s that bright yellow again. This time mixed with black stripes which help this Prairie Warbler blend into a bush as he fought the urge to flee. He flew.

Tenoroc FMA

 

One of the benefits of our sub-tropical environment is we get to enjoy dragonflies later in the year than those living in cooler climates. A Halloween Pennant (Celithemis eponina) can brighten up the dreariest day.

Tenoroc FMA

 

A new species for us! A huge dragon flew in front of the car and I about put Gini through the windshield (again) trying to stop, grab the camera and open the door all at the same time. The very courteous specimen grabbed a nearby branch and posed for several candid shots. Our newest find:  Royal River Cruiser (Macromia taeniolata)!

Tenoroc FMA

Tenoroc FMA

 

Stocky members of the heron family, American Bitterns are another of our fall/winter visitors. Their brown striped plumage allows them to remain motionless among reeds and escape detection. They are fairly uncommon in our county.

Tenoroc FMA

 

Spaniards exploring Florida over 500 years ago brought pigs with them for food. They left a few behind. We now have a feral pig problem. They proliferate faster than they can be hunted or trapped. As with most species, the babies can be pretty cute.

Tenoroc FMA

 

A beautiful Snowy Egret patiently waits for a frog to move. Yum.

Tenoroc FMA

 

Mrs. Belted Kingfisher has spied breakfast!

Tenoroc FMA

 

Mrs. Belted Kingfisher proudly displays her catch!

Tenoroc FMA

 

Mrs. Belted Kingfisher laughs loudly at Mr. Belted Kingfisher who has not had any breakfast!

Tenoroc FMA

 

Mr. Belted Kingfisher knows better than to say anything at all!

Tenoroc FMA

 

We are very thankful (I can’t believe I’m saying this) to the government forces which partnered with commercial interests and private citizens over half a century ago to create a real treasure for all citizens to enjoy. Hopefully, such success stories will motivate more people in all walks of life to encourage similar projects throughout the country (and beyond).

Enjoy your search for a natural place and come back for a visit!

 

Additional Information

Tenoroc Public Use Area

Great Florida Birding and Wildlife Trail

Categories: Birds, Florida, Photography, Travel, Wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 12 Comments

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