Posts Tagged With: american kestrel

Coast

A dictionary provides two different definitions of “coast”.

  1. Noun – the land near a shore : seashore
  2. Verb (intransitive) – to proceed easily without special application of effort or concern

Not too long ago, Gini and I visited the “land near a shore” where we were very careful to “proceed easily without special application of effort or concern” for a few days. Hard work, but SOMEONE has to do it!

As the philosopher/sailor/singer, Jimmy Buffet, sings:

“These changes in latitudes, changes in attitudes, Nothing remains quite the same. Through all of the islands and all of the highlands, If we couldn’t laugh we would all go insane”

I’m happy to report there was much laughter and we returned no more insane than when we departed.

The coast is a wonderful place for us. In our sub-tropical paradise, the salt water is warm and the currents gentle. Sand caresses your toes and there is always a fresh breeze to cool your brow. We attempted to overdose on boiled fresh shrimp but were unsuccessful. There were plenty of birds to see especially if you put forth the effort to visit a few different environments. But we constantly reminded each other of that pesky definition. To coast: “to proceed easily without special application of effort or concern”. We wouldn’t want to violate an actual definition.

Here’s some stuff we saw while we were coasting through the days at the coast.

Sunrise from the back porch of the houseboat.

Apalachicola

 

Ring-billed Gulls were abundant. And noisy.

Apalachicola

 

Across the marsh a prescribed burn in the nearby national forest produced what Gini called a “smoke monster”. Happily, it didn’t head our direction.

Apalachicola

 

A bright male Northern Cardinal provided a nice splash of color in the reeds of the marsh.

Apalachicola

 

Sunsets were somewhat spectacular. A Great Blue Heron headed home after a day’s fishing.

Apalachicola

 

On our second day, we drove into the national forest (past that burn area!) for a little exploration. Sunrise along the way caught our attention.

Apalachicola

 

In the heavily wooded forest, a Hermit Thrush was curious about us.

Apalachicola

 

A male American Kestrel was annoyed with us because he was tracking a small critter in the understory.

Apalachicola

 

Back on the houseboat, we watched a pair of Bald Eagles fish as the tide receded. The two mates, perched on that sign made me think of Gini and I. Like the eagles, we’re partners for life and like the sign says, we’re going through life at a slow pace trying not to create much fuss.

Apalachicola

 

The Laughing Gulls always sounded the alert when they saw us on the porch, hoping we had brought a helping of shrimp for them. Nope.

Apalachicola

 

Brown Pelicans are fun to watch as they soar and dive onto a school of fish, scooping them up with their net-like beaks.

Apalachicola

 

A final sunset from the porch. Heading home in the morning. Sigh.

Apalachicola

 

We coasted to the coast and back again. Can’t wait for an encore. If you don’t have a coast nearby, coast away somewhere special for a day or two. Laugh a lot so you don’t go insane.

 

Enjoy your search for a natural place and come back for a visit.

Categories: Birds, Florida, Photography, Travel | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Medicinal Plant Creek

Okay, let’s face it. Translating from one language to another can be a tricky thing. According to my research, the location I tramped around in, Itchepackesassa Creek Wetlands, is from the Muscogee (Creek) Native American language and means “Medicinal Plant” Creek Wetlands. I highly prefer the original. It’s rhythmic, takes effort to pronounce and reminds me of a very old children’s song having to do with a soda cracker. And I didn’t find any medicinal plants, either.

What I did find was an abundance of life! Flowers were showing off their spring beauty. Tall pines and stately oaks mixed with bay, laurel, hickory and other tree species. Small mammal footprints in the mud were like a mini-census: raccoon, squirrel, opossum, white-tailed deer and otter. Tall grass pressed flat formed “slides” around the shoreline where alligators entered and left the water. A plethora of insects thrive in the wet environment. An Eastern Black Racer (a magnificent snake species for those unfamiliar) enjoyed one of those insects before “racing” off the path as I approached. Did I mention the birds?

The man-made impoundment includes areas of open water with varying depths to attract a diversity of water birds. Plantings of erosion-protecting and filtering vegetation helps insure the water remains clean and the area stable. With a relatively dense area of tall-growing plants throughout the wetlands, many birds feel comfortable nesting here. I found a family of Sandhill Cranes, new Common Gallinule chicks, Osprey catching fish and returning to a nearby nest to feed two young fish hawks and young Black-crowned Night Herons roosting on an island.

No matter how you pronounce it, Itchepackesassa Creek Wetlands is a wonderful place to explore any day! (It doesn’t hurt that it’s only 15 minutes from the house, either.)

Yes, there are a few pictures of the morning slog. 

Fairly new Sandhill Crane chicks are almost independent but still don’t stray too far from Mom and Dad.

Itchepackesassa Creek Wetlands

Itchepackesassa Creek Wetlands 

 

A pair of American Kestrels have taken up residence in the wetlands. Hope I can get photos of some new chicks soon!

Itchepackesassa Creek Wetlands

 

An adult Black-crowned Night Heron passed nearby grunting his displeasure at my presence.

Itchepackesassa Creek Wetlands

 

Spring in the wetlands means plenty of Red-winged Blackbirds singing from atop trees. This guy was singing “Moonlight Sonata”. No. Really. He was.

Itchepackesassa Creek Wetlands

 

Thistle flowers are so beautiful to observe yet so painful to touch.

Itchepackesassa Creek Wetlands

 

Not wishing to be outdone by a blackbird, a Limpkin tries serenading his love from atop a skinny tree branch. Two lessons learned: those big claws are more comfortable on solid ground and there is no way a Limpkin’s call could be confused with a serenade.  (Limpkin “Serenade”)

Itchepackesassa Creek Wetlands

 

An Osprey scans the water below for a fresh fish breakfast which will be shared by two young chicks in a nearby nest.

Itchepackesassa Creek Wetlands

 

The morning sun shows off some of the iridescence in the plumage of a Glossy Ibis.

Itchepackesassa Creek Wetlands

 

Wood Ducks love the many places they can hide within the wetlands’ tall grasses and reeds.

Itchepackesassa Creek Wetlands

 

A Common Grackle harasses a Swallow-tailed Kite. The grackle was no match for the flying skills of the kite, which flew a couple of circles around the attacker and dove toward the ground suddenly leaving the poor grackle alone in the sky.

Itchepackesassa Creek Wetlands

 

This is a wonderful spot for a morning walk and always yields a diversity of life at which one can marvel. We hope you have a place near where you live which offers a respite from the ordinary.

 

Enjoy your search for a natural place and come back for a visit!

Categories: Birds, Florida, Photography, Travel | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | 12 Comments

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